About

The Conservation Almanac is a growing repository of information and data about land conservation in America from The Trust for Public Land (TPL). TPL’s Center for Conservation Finance created the Almanac for policy makers, the media, foundations, academics, public officials, and conservation leaders. The data – never before gathered in one place – provides a context for assessing the impacts of conservation and the growing number of state and local conservation funding measures.

Explore Programs & Trends in Your State

The Conservation Almanac is a web-based resource of conservation spending and statistics. On this site you can discover, analyze, and map the results of federal, state, and local funding for land conservation since 1998.

Conservation Easements

The Conservation Almanac also populates the National Conservation Easement Database (NCED). NCED is the first national database of conservation easement information, compiling records from land trusts and public agencies throughout the United States. Visit www.conservationeasement.us to learn more.

Citing the Conservation Almanac

To recognize the valuable role of the Conservation Almanac, users of the Conservation Almanac are asked to formally acknowledge the data source. This acknowledgment should occur as a formal citation. The citation can be formatted as follows:

The Trust for Public Land, Conservation Almanac, 2019, www.conservationalmanac.org.

Sponsors

The Conservation Almanac has been generously supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, Knobloch Family Foundation, Turner Foundation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wyss Foundation, Vervane Foundation, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

Contact Information

For any questions, or if you would like to share updated data, please contact Jessica Welch at jessica.welch@tpl.org.

To obtain spatial data, please contact Mitchel Hannon at mitchel.hannon@tpl.org.

If you are using the Conservation Almanac in your research, please let us know! Contact Andrew du Moulin at andrew.dumoulin@tpl.org.


About The Trust for Public Land

The Trust for Public Land creates parks and protects land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come. TPL’s Center for Conservation Finance gathers and disperses information and data on conservation and conservation funding in America through the Conservation Almanac and LandVote, an online database of state and local conservation funding ballot measures. TPL’s Conservation Finance Program has helped states and localities generate more than $79 billion in public funding for land conservation, parks, and restoration since 1996.

TPL Research

The TPL LandVote Database® is a comprehensive repository of conservation ballot measures by state, finance mechanisms, and jurisdiction type since 1988. GIS-enabled and highly customizable, LandVote is a powerful tool for communities, policymakers, and conservation professionals.

The Conservation Almanac is the go-to site for discovering, analyzing, and mapping the results of federal, state, and local funding for land conservation. The Almanac tracks conservation spending with data on acreage, source of funds, and dozens of other attributes, allowing users to assess and compare the value of conservation investments over time.

The National Conservation Easement Database (NCED) is the first national database of conservation easement information, compiling records from land trusts and public agencies throughout the United States and providing a comprehensive picture of the estimated 40 million acres of conservation easement lands.

TPL Publications

The Conservation Finance Handbook guides communities seeking to raise conservation funds at the ballot box.

The Economic Benefits of Land Conservation provides quantitative and authoritative research on the economic benefits land conservation can bring to communities.

The Conservation Program Handbook provides all the information that conservation professionals need to initiate or evaluate a local conservation land acquisition program.

Making the Most of Our Money profiles state programs that are catalysts of conservation, leading local governments and a network of other partners in protecting our land and water resources and making them accessible.